‘Students For Trump’ Founder Pleads Guilty To Pretending To Be A Lawyer

The 23-year-old male who founded the groups Students for Trump pleaded guilty in a Manhattan federal court on Tuesday to wire fraud conspiracy for running a $46,000 scam in which he pretended to be a lawyer offering legal advice online.

The founder, John Lambert, created a fake website for a fake law firm called Pope & Dunn, where he pretended to be an NYU Law School graduate named John Pope. He claimed he had a finance degree from the University of Pennsylvania and had worked in corporate law for 15 years, according to the New York Daily News.

Lambert will be sentenced in November. As part of his plea deal, he agreed not to appeal a sentence that is 21-months or less and will hand over the $46,000 he scammed out of clients.

Read the source article at Talking Points Memo

Judge denies J&J motion to end opioid trial

An ongoing lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson for its part in the opioid crisis will continue after the company’s effort to have the case dismissed was denied Cleveland County District Judge Thad Balkman. He denied a motion to toss the lawsuit, which accuses Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiaries of creating a public nuisance and costing the state of Oklahoma billions of dollars.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter told the court during proceedings that 4,653 Oklahomans died of unintentional overdoses involving prescription opioids from 2007 to 2017, and that there were more than 28,000 admissions for opioid and heroin treatment through state services from 2012 to 2018.

Read the source article at cnn.com

Strip club to host golf tournament at Trump resort

The Trump Organization’s golf resort in Doral, Florida, will host a charity golf tournament this week put on by a strip club in the Miami area that will include dancers serving as “caddy girls” for the tournament’s participants.

The Shadow Cabaret is set to hold the “Shadow All Star Tournament” at the resort on Saturday, according to the Post. The paper said the “Trump name and family crest are displayed prominently in the strip club’s advertising materials,” which indicate that participation in the event ranges from $450 for a single player to $1,800 for a group of four with VIP upgrades available.

Read the source article at cnn.com

Tennessee parents fight against damage caps

  • Cathy and Bobby Roberts lost their son in a crash caused by a faulty tire the maker knew about.
  • Tennessee has a law that limits jury awards in civil cases.
  • Tennessee’s law — passed to attract businesses — has been struck down by a federal appeals court.
  • The Roberts settled their case, but are fighting on behalf of other families for repeal of the law.

Read the source article at News, Sports, Business

Trump’s July 4th event bankrupted D.C. security fund

District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser government says that the cost of President Donald Trump’s Fourth of July celebration and the cost of addressing recent protests has emptied out a municipal fund used to provide security for public events and defend against terrorist threats.

In a letter to Trump dated July 9, Bowser says the city spent about $1.7 million on Trump’s “July 4th holiday activities and subsequent first amendment demonstrations,” as a result, the city’s Emergency Planning and Security Fund (EPSF) will likely be empty before the end of the fiscal year. Bowser asked for the Trump administration’s help in covering D.C.’s security costs, citing “declining reserves, increased demand for heightened security, and a one-time drawdown of $7.3 million to cover security costs associated with the 2017 Presidential Inauguration.”

Read the source article at USA TODAY

Hawaii becomes 26th state to decriminalize marijuana

Hawaii has become the 26th state in the nation to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana — but its governor cautioned it does not mean the state is ready to say aloha to legalizing recreational use of cannabis.

Under the new law, people caught with small amounts of marijuana will no longer face a misdemeanor charge that had been punishable by up to 30 days in jail and a $1,000 fine. Now people caught with 3 ounces or less of weed can still be hit with a citation carrying a $130 fine, but no jail term.

Read the source article at forbes.com

11th Circuit: Fla. Man Can’t Shield IRA In Bankruptcy

An Individual Retirement Account can be an asset protection vehicle. But the Eleventh Circuit decision in Yerian v Webber confirmed a judgment that Keith Yerian’s self-directed IRA could go to his creditors.

Keith Yerian’s behavior was on the egregious side. He titled IRA-owned cars in his own name and his wife’s name, as well as purchased a condo in Puerto Rico with IRA funds and then using the condo for his personal travel needs. Yerian concedes that he incurred over $100,000 in tax penalties for abusing his IRA.

Yerian claimed that the assets inside the self-directed IRA were exempt.  The basis for the trustee’s challenge was that the assets were not managed in accordance with the IRA’s governing document, which required that there not be “prohibited transactions”.

Read the source article at forbes.com

Big Perkins franchisee files Chapter 11

A franchisee of 27 Perkins Restaurant & Bakery locations filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Monday after losing the right to use the parent company’s name.

The franchisee, 5171 Campbells Land Co., based in Rankin, Pa., said in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania filing that it had assets of between $1 million and $10 million and liabilities in range of $10 million to $50 million.

According to local reports, 5171 Campbells operates restaurants in Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. Earlier this month, a federal judge in Memphis, Tenn., granted franchisor Perkins & Marie Callender’s Inc. a restraining order that kept the franchisee from operating under the Perkins name and ordered it to stop using signs, flags, menus and anything else displaying any Perkins trademarks, and also to change the restaurants’ phone numbers.

Read the source article at Restaurant Business Magazine

Aequitas investors recover $234.6M for Ponzi scheme

Investors burned in the Aequitas financial scandal scored a major victory when a handful of accounting firms, securities operations and lawyers accused of aiding and abetting the fraud agreed to settle for $234.6 million.

Together with funds raised by the receiver through the sale of various Aequitas assets, the total recovery could exceed $300 million.

The settling defendants are accounting giant Deloitte, Portland law firm Tonkon Torp, EisnerAmper, a second accounting firm, legal giant Sidley Austin TD Ameritrade; Integrity Bank & Trust of Colorado; and the rating agency Duff & Phelps.

Read the source article at oregonlive.com