Civil rights restored to 20,000 Virginia ex-felons

Governor Ralph Northam announced that more than 20,000 Virginians previously convicted of a felony have had their civil rights restored since he took office in January 2018.

A total of 22,205 people had their rights restored. The restored civil rights include the right to vote, serve on a jury, run for public office and become a notary public.

“Virginia remains one of the few states in the nation that permanently strip individuals of their civil rights after a felony conviction,” said Northam in a release. “I’m proud to use my executive clemency power to restore those rights to Virginians who have completed their sentences and returned to their communities seeking a second chance. This is about doing what is fair and right, and is an important part of our ongoing work to build a stronger, more accessible, and more inclusive Commonwealth.”

In February, Northam announced that more than 10,000 people had their civil rights restored since taking office.

Read the source article at nbc12.com

140 ransomware attacks on local governments, police and hospitals

Just this year alone, 140 attacks targeting public state and local governments and health care providers have been reported, according to a tally by the cybersecurity firm Recorded Future, which has tracked attacks on local governments since 2013 and the healthcare industry since 2016.

The attacks have targeted schools, local government offices and hospitals. One recent victim was a network of Alabama hospitals that had to stop accepting new patients because of a ransomware attack.

“Undoubtedly the number of attacks this year across all sectors is in the thousands,” Recorded Future senior solutions architect Allan Liska tells CNN. “In fact, most security firms estimate that 2019 is set to see the highest number.”

Read the source article at CNN International

11th Circuit: Fla. Man Can’t Shield IRA In Bankruptcy

An Individual Retirement Account can be an asset protection vehicle. But the Eleventh Circuit decision in Yerian v Webber confirmed a judgment that Keith Yerian’s self-directed IRA could go to his creditors.

Keith Yerian’s behavior was on the egregious side. He titled IRA-owned cars in his own name and his wife’s name, as well as purchased a condo in Puerto Rico with IRA funds and then using the condo for his personal travel needs. Yerian concedes that he incurred over $100,000 in tax penalties for abusing his IRA.

Yerian claimed that the assets inside the self-directed IRA were exempt.  The basis for the trustee’s challenge was that the assets were not managed in accordance with the IRA’s governing document, which required that there not be “prohibited transactions”.

Read the source article at forbes.com