Reflecting on access to justice

Like so many others, the legal profession faces an uncertain future with regards to how technology can make it easier for more Americans to get the help they need. A recent seminar at Stanford University examined how lawyers may need to revamp the current paradigm to find ways to provide more and better access to justice, especially to those who cannot afford to hire a lawyer in the traditional way. Mary Juetten assesses the problem in this story at Forbes.

How the legal profession is failing low and middle-income people

The numbers are daunting: 80 percent of low-income Americans can’t afford the legal help they need. The middle class isn’t doing much better, either: 40-to-60 percent of them have legal needs they can’t afford. What can be done to provide legal assistance to these parts of the population who arguably need it most? Law school professors Jennifer Bard and Larry Cunningham take a look attorney feesat what needs to be changed in this story at the Washington Post.